Childhood Letter of Introduction

Thank you for visiting this section of our website. The information provided in this section will likely provide you with up-to-date facts about Down syndrome. We are fortunate to have an organization right here in the Capital District that provides information and support to parents, professionals and individuals who seek information on issues about Down syndrome.

The Down Syndrome Aim High Resource Center (DSAHRC) is a not-for-profit organization with a Board of Directors, a professional staff, and families and professionals committed to increasing opportunities for individuals with Down syndrome. The purpose of DSAHRC is to enlighten and encourage the broader community to recognize the individuality, uniqueness, and capabilities of individuals with Down syndrome, and to reflect the hopes and dreams of those individuals and their families.

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Tuesday, 20 December 2011 21:46

NASP Resources

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Home and school-everyone shares the goal of helping children learn and feel successful
Tuesday, 20 December 2011 21:25

Testing at your child's school

A parent's guide to testing at your child's school.
Tuesday, 20 December 2011 21:23

Continuum Special Education Service

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Research on specially designed instruction clearly supports high quality instruction provided to the greatest extent possible to meet the student's individualized education program (IEP) in the general education classrooms where students with disabilities have the greatest likelihood or receiving curriculum content delivered by highly qualified teachers. Schools may utilized a variety of combinations of special education supports and services to serve students with disabilities in general education settings and promote meaningful access, participation and progress in the general curriculum, including consultant teacher services, paraprofessional support, resource room services, and integrated co-teaching.

Tuesday, 20 December 2011 20:20

Early Childhood Direction Center

ECDCD provides information, referral and support to families and professionals working with children, both typically developing and those with special education needs, ages birth through five

A parent's first encounter with the Individualized Education Program--the IEP--can be intimidating. However, participating in special education planning is critical in assuring positive long-term outcomes for students with disabilities.

Parents and guardians of school-age children with disabilities need to be familiar with relevant regulations and procedures for developing an IEP to fully participate in IEP development and long-term planning. Similarly, students who have attained legal adult statues in their state and have assumed responsibility for their own IEP need information to assure information participation at their IEP meetings.

Tuesday, 20 December 2011 20:12

The IEP Toolkit

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The special education system can be confusing, frustrating, and overwhelming. The Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) is the written document that outlines your child's specific educational program. We know a strong IEP is necessary for our child's individual needs to be met. Yet is is common for us to feel insecure and unprepared during our child's IEP meeting. Surrounded by teachers, administrators, and special education personnel, our voice can get lost. This toolkit was written to help you find your voice.

As family members of a child with Down syndrome, we come to IEP meetings with love for our child and a commitment to his or her education. We must also come with a strong understanding of the IEP itself, detailed information about our child's specific needs, and an understanding of appropriate goals. This IEP Toolkit is designed to help you gather the necessary information. Focused preparation is essential to the development od an effective education plan, and a strong IEP leads to improved educational success for your child.

Tuesday, 20 December 2011 20:10

Tips for Teaching Students with Down Syndrome

  • Have high expectations for the student. Be enthusiastic and encouraging.
  • When planning a student's instructional program, be guided by the student's individual ability and needs, and not the label of Down syndrome.
  • If the student is highly distractible, seat the student away from windows and doors to minimize distractions in the environment.
  • The correct name of this diagnosis is Down syndrome. There is no apostrophe (Down). The “s” in syndrome is NOT capitalized (syndrome).

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